Ahn vs his landlord

Ahn approaches a Centre for help. He is in dispute with his real estate agent in regards to making minor alterations to the property which he rents. Ahn stripped off the lino and polished the floors, not the agent is claiming he should pay to have new lino installed. The Centre provides Legal Advice (Legal Advice 1), but it is clear that more needs to be done.

Scenario 1:

The Centre helps Ahn write a letter (Legal Task 1). Ahn sends the letter, and several weeks later, calls and says the real estate agent has agreed not to take the matter further. The Centre provides advice about what to do if something happens again (Legal Advice 2).

Scenario 2:

Several weeks after Ahn last spoke to the Centre, he calls again.  The real estate agent is now asking for access to the premises at a time when Ahn cannot be home. The Centre fears the agent is now beginning to harrass Ahn in retaliation for asserting his rights. The Centre assesses Ahn's matter and his capability, and decides he can manage the matter on his own with the Centre providing support. The Centre opens an Other Representation - Ongoing Legal Support service.

Scenario 3:

Ahn drops in with a notification from the Tenancy Tribunal that the agent is taking him to the Tribunal.  The Centre assesses Ahn's matter and his capability, and decides he can manage the matter on his own with the Centre providing support. The Centre opens an Other Representation - Ongoing Legal Support service.

Scenario 4:

Ahn drops in with a notification from the Tenancy Tribunal that the agent is taking him to the Tribunal.  When the Centre assesses Ahn's matter and his capability, they note that Ahn does not read or write English well, is on a low income, and is at risk of homelessness if the landlord retaliates and evicts him. The Centre decides to act for Ahn.  As the matter is already in the Tribunal, a Court/Tribunal Representation Service is opened.